Sewer Ejector Pumps: Troubleshooting The Most Common Problems

Posted on: 28 November 2016

While there are many homeowners who rely on sewer ejector pumps, most don't know a great deal about them. These pumps are a part of sewer systems that would otherwise have trouble delivering waste and wastewater to a designated sewer system or septic tank, either because of a steep incline in the drainage lines or some other obstacle. Therefore, these pumps serve a highly valuable service. If you have a sewer ejector pump in place in your septic system, it is a good idea to get to know a few of the problems that can arise so you will know when it is time to reach out to a septic service professional for help.
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Tips For Working With Teflon Plumber's Tape

Posted on: 28 November 2016

If you need to make a plumbing repair but do not have any experience in doing so, then it is important that you understand how to properly use Teflon plumber's tape. Teflon plumber's tape is used to seal joints where you have joined two pieces of metal or PVC pipe together, and its purpose is to keep the joined area from leaking water. While plumber's tape is simple to use, it does have a few quirks that require you use the right techniques when working with it.
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Understanding The Storm Season's Septic System Threat

Posted on: 21 November 2016

As a homeowner with a septic system, it is important that you understand how environmental changes can affect it. For example, heavy rain storms can be highly problematic for your home's septic system. If you've got heavy rains coming, it's in your best interest to prepare your home and your septic system for the effects of all of that excess water in the ground. Here's a look at what you need to know to do just that.
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Understanding Your Septic System

Posted on: 17 November 2016

If you live in an area without a municipal sewage system, your household water and wastes go through a septic system buried in your yard. The system is comprised of two parts, a tank to hold solid wastes and a drainfield to disperse the water wastes. If your septic tank is kept in good working order, and is the right size for your household, you should only need to have it drained every three to five years.
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